How to optimise a code to be JIT friendly

In the previous blog post, we measured the effect of simplest JVM JIT optimisation technique of method inlining. The code example was a bit unnatural as it was super simple Scala code just for demonstration purposes of method inlining. In this post, I would like to share a general approach I am using when I want to check how JIT treats my code or if there is some possibility to improve the code performance in regards to JIT. Even the method inlining requires the code to meet certain criteria as bytecode length of inlined methods etc. For this purpose, I am regularly using great OpenJDK project called JITWatch which comes with a bunch of handy tools in regard to JIT. I am pretty sure that there is probably more tools and I will be more than happy if you can share your approaches when dealing with JIT in the comment section below the article.
Java HotSpot is able to produce a very detailed log of what the JIT compiler is exactly doing and why. Unfortunately, the resulting log is very complex and difficult to read. Reading this log would require an understanding of the techniques and theory that underline JIT compilation. A free tool like JITWatch process those logs and abstract this complexity away from the user.








In order to produce log suitable for JIT Watch investigation the tested application needs to be run with following JVM flags:
-XX:+UnlockDiagnosticVMOptions

-XX:+LogCompilation

-XX:+TraceClassLoading
those settings will produce log file hotspot_pidXXXXX.log. For purpose of this article, I re-used code from the previous blog located on my GitHub account with JVM flags enabled in build.sbt.
In order to look into generated machine code in JITWatch we need to install HotSpot Disassembler (HSDIS) to install it to $JAVA_HOME/jre/lib/server/. For Mac OS X that can be used from here and try renaming it to hsdis-amd64-dylib. In order to include machine code into generated JIT log we need to add JVM flag -XX:+PrintAssembly.
[info] 0x0000000103e5473d: test %r13,%r13
[info] 0x0000000103e54740: jne 0x0000000103e5472a
[info] 0x0000000103e54742: mov $0xfffffff6,%esi
[info] 0x0000000103e54747: mov %r14d,%ebp
[info] 0x0000000103e5474a: nop
[info] 0x0000000103e5474b: callq 0x0000000103d431a0 ; OopMap{off=112}
[info] ;*invokevirtual inc
[info] ; - com.jaksky.jvm.tests.jit.IncWhile::testJit@12 (line 19)
[info] ; {runtime_call}
[info] 0x0000000103e54750: callq 0x0000000102e85c18 ;*invokevirtual inc
[info] ; - com.jaksky.jvm.tests.jit.IncWhile::testJit@12 (line 19)
[info] ; {runtime_call}
[info] 0x0000000103e54755: xor %r13d,%r13d
We run the JITWatch via ./launchUI.sh
JITWATCH_config
to configure source files and target generated class files
JITWatch_configuration

And finally, open prepared JIT log and hit Start.

The most interesting from our perspective is TriView where we can see the source code, JVM bytecode and native code. For this particular example we disabled method inlining via JVM Flag “-XX:CompileCommand=dontinline, com/jaksky/jvm/tests/jit/IncWhile.inc

JITWatch_notinlined
To just compare with the case when the method body of IncWhile.inc is inlined – native code size is greater 216 compared to 168 with the same bytecode size.
JITWatch-inlined
Compile Chain provides also a great view of what is happening with the code
JITWatch_compileChain
Inlining report provides a great overview what is happening with the code
JITWatch-inlining
As it can be seen the effect of tiered compilation as described in JIT optimisation starts with client C1 JIT optimisation and then switches to server C2 optimisation. The same or even better view can be found on Compiler Thread activity which provides a timeline view. To refresh memory check overview of JVM threads. Note: standard java code is subject to JIT optimizations too that’s why so many compilation activities here.
JITWatch_compilerThreads
JITWatch is a really awesome tool and provides many others views which don’t make sense to screenshot all e.g. cache code allocation, nmethodes etc. For detail information, I really suggest reading JITWatch wiki pages.  Now the question is how to write JIT friendly code? Here pure jewel of JITWatch comes in: Suggestion Tool. That is why I like JITWatch so much. For demonstration, I selected somewhat more complex problem – N Queens problem.
JITWatch_suggestion
Suggestion tool clearly describes why certain compilations failed and what was the exact reason. It is a coincidence that in this example we hit again just inlining as there is definitely more going on in JIT but this window provides a clear view of how we can possibly help JIT.
Another great tool which is also a part of JITWatch is JarScan Tool. This utility will scan a list of jars and count bytecode size of every method and constructor. The purpose of this utility is to highlight the methods that are bigger than HotSpot threshold for inlining hot methods (default 35 bytes) so it provides hints where to focus benchmarking to see whether decomposing code into smaller methods brings some performance gain. Hotness of the method is determined by the set of heuristics including call frequency etc. But what can eliminate the method from inlining is its size. For sure just the method size it too big breaching some limit for inlining doesn’t automatically mean that method is a performance bottleneck. JarScan tool is static analysis tool which has no knowledge of runtime statistics hence real method hotness.
jakub@MBook ~/Development/GIT_REPO (master) $ ./jarScan.sh --mode=maxMethodSize --limit=35 ./chess-challenge/target/scala-2.12/classes/
"cz.jaksky.chesschallenge","ChessChallange$","delayedEndpoint$cz$jaksky$chesschallenge$ChessChallange$1","",1281
"cz.jaksky.chesschallenge.solver","ChessBoardSolver$","placeFigures$1","scala.collection.immutable.List,scala.collection.immutable.Set",110
"cz.jaksky.chesschallenge.solver","ChessBoardSolver$","visualizeSolution","scala.collection.immutable.Set,int,int",102
"cz.jaksky.chesschallenge.domain","Knight","check","cz.jaksky.chesschallenge.domain.Position,cz.jaksky.chesschallenge.domain.Position",81
"cz.jaksky.chesschallenge.domain","Queen","equals","java.lang.Object",73
"cz.jaksky.chesschallenge.domain","Rook","equals","java.lang.Object",73
"cz.jaksky.chesschallenge.domain","Bishop","equals","java.lang.Object",73
"cz.jaksky.chesschallenge.domain","Knight","equals","java.lang.Object",73
"cz.jaksky.chesschallenge.domain","King","equals","java.lang.Object",73
"cz.jaksky.chesschallenge.domain","Position","Position","int,int",73
"cz.jaksky.chesschallenge.domain","Position","equals","java.lang.Object",72
To wrap up, JITWatch is a great tool which provides insight into HotSpot JIT compilations happening during program execution and it can help you to understand how a decision made at the source code level can affect the performance of the program.
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Online collaboration tools for distributed teams

During past several years, working habits and working style has been rapidly changing. And this trend will continue for sure, just visit Google trends and search for “Digital nomad” or “Remote work”. However some profession undergoes this change with a better ease than others. But it is clear that companies that understand that trend benefit from that.

Working in a different style requires a brand new set of tools and approaches which provides you similar working conditions as when people are co-located at the same office. Video conferencing and phone or skype is just the beginning and doesn’t cover all aspects.

In the following paragraphs, I am going to summarize tools I found useful while working as software developer remotely in a fully distributed team. Those tools are either free or offer some free functionality and I still consider them very useful in various situations. The spectrum of the tools starts with some project management or planning tools to communicate.

For the communication – chat and calls Slack becomes standard tool widely adopted now. It allows you to freely organize your teams, let them create channels they need. It supports a wide range of plugins e.g. chatbots and it is well integrated with others tools. Provides application on all desktop and mobile platforms.

slack

When solving some issue or just want to present something to the audience screen sharing becomes a very handy tool. Found Join.me pretty handy. Free plan with the limited size of the audience was just big enough. Working well on Mac OS and Windows, Linux platform I haven’t tried yet.

joinme

When it comes to the pure conferencing phone calls or chat Discord recently took my breath away by the awesome sound quality. Again it offers desktop and mobile clients. plus you can use just browser version if you do not wish to install anything on your PC.

discord

Now I slightly move to planning and designing tools during software development process and doesn’t matter if you use Scrum or Kanban. Those have their place there. Shared task board with post-it notes. The one I found useful and free is Scrumblr. The only disadvantage is that it is public. It allows you to design the number of sections, change the colours of the notes and add them markers etc.

scrumblr

When we touched an agile development methodology there is no planning and estimation without planning poker. I found useful BitPoints. Simple yet meeting all our needs and free online tool where you invite all participants to the game. It allows you to do a various setting like the type of deck etc.

bitpoints

When designing phase reached shared online diagramming tools we found really useful is Sketchboard. It offers a wide range of diagrams types and shapes. It offers traditional UML diagrams for sure. Free versions offer few private diagrams otherwise you go public with your design. Allows comments and team discussion.

sketchboard

Sometimes we just missed traditional whiteboard session and just brainstorm. So a web white board tool AWW meet our needs. Simple yet powerfull.

aww

This concludes the set of tools I found useful during a past year while working in a distributed team remotely. I hope that you found at least one useful or didn’t know it before. Do you have other tools you found useful or have better variants of those mentioned above? Please share it in the comment section!